Mission Statement
What do we want?

To protect this unique landscape from developers and ensure it becomes part of the Otuataua
Stonefields Historic Reserve for future generations to enjoy.

What can you do?

Occupy the land, virtually.

In doing so, you’ll be sending a powerful message to Mayor Phil Goff, Auckland Council
and Government to help convince them to protect Ihumātao for you, your family and all New Zealanders.

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Number of occupants
004055

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Send an automated email to Mayor Phil Goff and Minister Nick Smith to communicate your opposition to the development.

I join this Virtual Occupation with others to call on the Government of New Zealand and Auckland Council to #Protect Ihumatao (SHA 62) for future generations.

I symbolically place myself on this land to stress that it is part of New Zealand’s precious and unique heritage.

I want this land protected because it contains important historical, cultural, archaeological, geological and spiritual values.

I ask Phil Goff to engage an independent facilitator to work constructively with all parties to find a way to ensure this land is formally protected as part of the Otuataua Stonefields Historic Reserve.

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how did we get here?

Right now, New Zealanders can still enjoy precious landscape near Auckland airport known for its views, its archaeological and geological heritage, its cultural and farming history, and its sacred significance as one of the places where Māori first settled in New Zealand.

Ihumātao is a special part of our history as a nation. But unless we do something right now, the ability to experience its magical atmosphere first hand will be gone for good, due to a large block of land designated as a Special Housing Area and known as SHA 62.

The Government granted the land (now SHA62) to a settler family in 1867 after confiscating it from local Māori who had lived there for centuries. Fast forward to 2007 – a former Council promised to buy this land for public open space. The intention was to protect its special values as part of the neighbouring Otuataua Stonefields Historic Reserve − our Stonehenge.

But that never happened and the land was later rezoned. Now the descendants of the family who were granted the land have decided to sell it to property developers - Fletchers.

Fletchers plan to build 480 houses on the land. If this development goes ahead, it will negatively affect the entire stonefields landscape; it will disrupt public access and destroy precious heritage and open space.

Let’s join together and stop them.

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now
if the development goes ahead